Three more buried lakes of liquid water discovered on Mars

Three more buried lakes of liquid water discovered on Mars
Three more buried lakes of liquid water discovered on Mars

Back in 2018, Scientists found what appeared to be a huge lake deep under the ice near Mars’s South Pole. Which was pretty surprising, because albeit there’s many evidence that water wont to flow across the surface, the probabilities of there still being liquid water seemed pretty slim. For one, the pressure from Mars’s atmosphere is so light that it might be impossible for water to remain during a liquid state in most places. then there’s the very fact that its surface temperature averages about -63 degrees Celsius. But an underground lake wasn’t out of the question. And last week, a study published in Nature Astronomy provided new evidence that this massive lake exists—and that there are smaller pools around it. The study was supported data from the spacecraft Mars Express, which also made the 2018 discovery. It’s currently orbiting the Mars and bouncing radar off it to explore beneath the surface.


How can a satellite measure what’s under the ground? Well, Mars Express does this by sending down pulses of radio waves, which penetrate the crust and recover in several ways counting on the fabric they travel through. So, the echo of those waves can help us tell the difference between water and rock, albeit we can’t see them. within the latest study, scientists collected bunch of this radar data and analyzed it employing a technique we use on Earth to seem for liquid water below glaciers, in places like Greenland and Antarctica. It’s an approach that’s designed to differentiate pools of water from frozen or dry layers of the crust. And surely, they found an underground lake right where they expected, about 20 by 30 kilometers wide. But it wasn’t alone! They also found evidence of other, three more buried lakes of liquid water surrounding this lake. The researchers still aren’t sure why exactly these lakes exist. they’ll have formed after some underground volcanic activity warmed up the world a few million years ago. And then, because the temperature dropped, natural salts dissolved within the water may have kept it from freezing, a bit like road salt keeps water from becoming ice. because of all that salt, this water isn’t likely to sustain future human explorers, but it gives us a replacement place to seem for current or past life.

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